Anthony Petrello: Supporting Research Into Childhood

Neurological Disorders
When most people hear Anthony Petrello’s name most remember him as a high school math whiz from Newark, New Jersey or remember him being the highest paid CEO in 2015 when Nabors Industries paid him more than $68 million.

But in Texas he is known for his philanthropic work with Texas Children’s Hospital. When his daughter Carena was diagnosed with periventricular leukomalacia when she was born prematurely, Petrello donated $7 million to Texas Children’s Hospital so they could build the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute. And he has continued to work with the hospital.

Follow @tony_petrello.

Anthony Petrello is the CEO of the largest land-based drilling contractor in the world, Nabors Industries. But since 1997 when his daughter was diagnosed with a disorder caused by lack of oxygen to her brain, and needed several surgeries to save her heart and her sight, he became deeply involved in philanthropy. It has changed the lives of the Petrellos dramatically. Doctors told them Carena would have cerebral palsy as she gets older. She lost her ability to speak at age 5 and needs a wheelchair to move around. It has forced them to change their expectations for her life.

Specialists offered little hope for treating Carena’s condition. Petrello realized there was little serious research being done on neurological diseases suffered by children. He met with the leadership at Texas Children’s Hospital and they envisioned an institute dedicated to studying neurological afflictions suffered by children. In 2006 Tony Petrello donated $7 million to the effort. He has also got help from others in the oil and gas industry. Oil man Dan L. Duncan donated $50 million. Today, the neurological center occupies 300,000 square feet and has over 130 researchers led by renowned Lebanese neurogeneticist Huda Zoghbi and offers hope for children in the future.

Learn more about Tony Petrello: https://www.crunchbase.com/person/anthony-petrello#/entity

Comments are Disabled